Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB)

Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR TB)

Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) is a relatively rare type of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB). It is resistant to almost all drugs used to treat TB, including the two best first-line drugs: isoniazid and rifampin. XDR TB is also resistant to the best second-line medications: fluoroquinolones and at least one of three injectable drugs (i.e., amikacin, kanamycin, or capreomycin).

How is XDR TB spread?

Drug-susceptible (regular) TB and XDR TB are spread the same way. TB germs are put into the air when a person with TB disease of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, speaks, or sings. These germs can float in the air for several hours, depending on the environment. Persons who breathe in the air containing these TB germs can become infected.

TB is not spread by

Why is XDR TB so serious?

Because XDR TB is resistant to the most powerful first-line and second-line drugs, patients are left with treatment options that are much less effective and often have worse treatment outcomes. XDR TB is of special concern for persons with HIV infection or other conditions that can weaken the immune system. These persons are more likely to develop TB disease once they are infected, and also have a higher risk of death once they develop TB disease.

Who is at risk for getting XDR TB?

Drug-resistant TB (MDR or XDR) is more common in people who:

How can I prevent myself from getting TB?

Avoid close contact or prolonged time with known TB patients in crowded, enclosed environments like clinics, hospitals, prisons, or homeless shelters

Can the TB vaccine (BCG) help prevent XDR TB?

There is a vaccine for TB disease called Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG). It is used in some countries to prevent severe forms of TB in children. However, BCG is not generally recommended in the United States because it has limited effectiveness for preventing TB in adults. The effect of BCG against XDR TB would likely be similar to the effect on drug-susceptible TB.

If I have regular (drug-susceptible) TB, how can I prevent getting drug-resistant TB?

The most important thing is for you to continue taking all your TB medicines exactly as prescribed. No doses should be missed and treatment should not be stopped early. You should tell your health care provider if you are having trouble taking the medications. If you plan to travel, make sure you have enough medicine to last while away.

Can XDR TB be treated and cured?

Yes, in some cases. Some TB control programs have shown that cure is possible for an estimated 30% of affected people. Successful outcomes depend greatly on the extent of the drug resistance, the severity of the disease, and whether the patient's immune system is weakened.

What are the symptoms of XDR TB?

The general symptoms of TB disease include feelings of sickness or weakness, weight loss, fever, and night sweats. The symptoms of TB disease of the lungs may also include coughing, chest pain, and coughing up blood. Symptoms of TB disease in other parts of the body depend on the area affected. If you have these symptoms, you should contact your doctor or local health department.

What should I do if I have been around someone who has XDR TB?

If you think you have been exposed to someone with TB disease, you should contact your doctor or local health department about getting a TB skin test or the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold test (QFT-G), a blood test. And tell the doctor or nurse when you spent time with this person.